Klematis - Hubert von Herkomer

Klematis - Hubert von Herkomer


Daemonia Nymphe - Hypnos 



#cantwait

#cantwait

(via conscius12)


An Italian Lady - Lord Frederic Leighton, 1859

An Italian Lady - Lord Frederic Leighton, 1859


Pavonia - Lord Frederic Leighton, 1858

Pavonia - Lord Frederic Leighton, 1858


Per Aspera! - Gabriel von Max, 1898

Per Aspera! - Gabriel von Max, 1898


oldroze:


Marble column from the Temple of Artemis at Sardis
ca. 300 B.C., Greek

The section of a fluted Ionic column in the center of this room stood over fifty-eight feet high in its original location at the Temple of Artemis. The delicate foliate carving on the capital is unique among extant capitals from the temple, and the torus (foliated base), with its vegetal scale-like pattern, is also exceptionally elaborate. This capital is slightly smaller than others found at the site, indicating that it does not belong to the outer colonnade. Two similar pairs of columns (marked in red on the plan shown nearby) stood in the east and west porches. The column, displayed here with most of the shaft omitted, was probably originally from one or more of those pairs. Alternatively, it may be from the cella (inner room) or from the inner back porch. Parts of the fluted shaft are restored, and the profiled base below the torus is a copy of the original.

oldroze:

Marble column from the Temple of Artemis at Sardis

ca. 300 B.C., Greek

The section of a fluted Ionic column in the center of this room stood over fifty-eight feet high in its original location at the Temple of Artemis. The delicate foliate carving on the capital is unique among extant capitals from the temple, and the torus (foliated base), with its vegetal scale-like pattern, is also exceptionally elaborate. This capital is slightly smaller than others found at the site, indicating that it does not belong to the outer colonnade. Two similar pairs of columns (marked in red on the plan shown nearby) stood in the east and west porches. The column, displayed here with most of the shaft omitted, was probably originally from one or more of those pairs. Alternatively, it may be from the cella (inner room) or from the inner back porch. Parts of the fluted shaft are restored, and the profiled base below the torus is a copy of the original.

(via mythologer)


(via mortisia)


Fever Ray - I’m Not Done


polemostasis:

Duel dans la clairière, Charles Cros

polemostasis:

Duel dans la clairière, Charles Cros

(via daimonphania)


 

allstarsandconstellations:

The Shield of Achilles
From Royal Collection © Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, 1821.

The silver-gilt convex shield has a central medallion cast in high relief with Apollo in a quadriga, surrounded by stars and female figures representing the constellations. The broad border is cast in low relief with scenes of human life (a wedding and banquet, siege, ambush and engagement, harvest, judicial appeal, vintage, oxherds defending their beasts and a Cretan dance), within an outer border of stylised waves and a broad reeded rim.

The shield is a ‘reconstruction’ of the mythological shield made for Achilles by the lame god Hephaestus and brought down to Earth by Thetis (mother of Achilles), together with other specially forged armor. The shield was said to have been a mirror of the world of gods and men, within the ‘mighty Stream of Ocean’ and although Homer described its appearance in great detail, the precise relationship of the various elements was unclear.

The final design of the shield was completed in 1817, by John Flaxman, and delivered to the king of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and king of Hanover, George IV.

(via the-fire-sermon)


The Piper at the Gates of Dawn - Arthur Rackham’s illustration of Pan from ‘The Wind in the Willows’, written by Kennet Grahame, 1935

The Piper at the Gates of Dawn - Arthur Rackham’s illustration of Pan from ‘The Wind in the Willows’, written by Kennet Grahame, 1935


blood flower n°2 by Sentiam on deviantart ©2010-2014

blood flower n°2 by Sentiam on deviantart ©2010-2014


B E A U T Y - dir. Rino Stefano Tagliafierro